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NYC’s Most Committed Busking Subway DJ Brings Ootz Ootz To Evening Commute: Gothamist

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The L Train, that unavoidable waystation between Brooklyn and Manhattan festooned with broken seats and bloody bandages, is set to shut down for lengthy repairs in less than a year. Which means you only have so much time left to catch… [checks notes]…the hardest-working subway DJ in New York City flex his wrists.

“I thought he was pretty good,” said straphanger Alex Tween, who enjoyed a little sampling of the subway busker’s sound earlier this year, and captured the video above. “He did that subway musician thing where he ignored the passengers.”

While Tween didn’t catch this particular subway DJ’s nom de plume at the time, it appears to be DJ Favrz, who describes himself as the “resident DJ” of the L train, according to his Instagram. DJ Favrz doesn’t just settle for entertaining commuters with his beats—he gets his whole body in on the action:

You can get a better look at his setup below—including the granny cart he uses to haul his gear onto the train (and quickly leave it when his set finishes).

DJ Favrz may be the most flexible subway DJ we’ve encountered, but he is far from the only person to drag their subwoofers onto trains. There’s also the Boston-based eponymous “Subway DJ,” who frequently takes to the NYC subway system and is apparently vying for the honor of being coronated the One True L Train DJ To Ootz Them All.

However, it seems like he may have ceded the L train to DJ Favrz, as his last couple social media posts about subway sets have taken place at 47-50 Rockefeller Center station, Brooklyn Museum, Union Square, Barclays Center and Fordham Road:

The MTA technically prohibits busking inside subway trains, even if you have a truly sick deck set-up: according to the MTA’s Subway Performance Rules, music is not allowed “when on or within a subway car; a bus; or, in any area not generally open to the public.” But there is nothing in the fine print specifically saying you can’t cross-fade your stems directly into the hearts of listeners until their BPM hits 180. Nor is there anything that says you can’t just go DJ at Subway.

And for amateurs thinking of taking their set on the road, make sure you come correct:





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